CW6~ The Epic of Esther

Okay.  So I didn’t start this until Tuesday (BAD idea) and then it just kept going and then it was 11:15 on Wednesday morning and I had to really finish!  That’s why it ends a little abruptly and out of meter.  (Btw, my meter was 10.11.10.11 and my rhyme scheme was ABAB.)  Oh, and please forgive my frequent slant rhymes… 🙂  And also, I apologize for the ridiculous length, but like I said, it just kept going.  And I’ll have to add some pictures later…  Like I said, I was in a bit of a rush… 🙂   So here it goes… (Don’t you like [dot-dot-dot’s]…?)


Lavish, luxurious, and grossly grand

The Persian king threw an extravagant feast.

“Bring forth crowned Queen Vashti!”  was his command.

But Beauty refused to obey her cruel Beast.

King Xerxes brimmed full of wine and of rage;

“Banish that upstart!”  roared his proud, wrathful voice.

When three years had passed, he sought out his sage,

“Should I bring Vashti back?  What’s your advice?”

“My king,” spoke the eunuch, “this is my plan:

“Gather virgins beautiful to your harem.

“Choose the fairest to be queen of your land.”

“Yes,” the satisfied king said, “let’s summon them.”

Among the maids was Hadassah the Jew,

A pretty, young girl fitting in with the rest,

Her origin hidden so no one knew.

Hadassah
… A pretty, young girl fitting in with the rest.

Lo and behold, Xerxes thought her the fairest.

A Jewess was now Persia’s Queen Esther.

On the scene enters Haman, Agagite lord,

Wiling his way to become vizier.

“King, make all bow to me,” were his scheming words.

So knees bent to him, the king’s right-hand man.

Yet one Hebrew guard would not at his feet fall –

Mordecai, Hadassah’s sole guardian.

Amalek, Haman’s forefather, fought Isr’el.

Mordecai’s prejudice and Jewish pride

Kept him standing tall when the vizier passed.

“I hate this Jew!” Haman burned to his bride.

And ev’n if I kill him, there’s more Hebrews – blast!”

“It is simple,” she smirked.  “Kill them all.”

The thought struck Haman’s fancy and vengeful spite.

Haman hurried to royal Xerxes’ hall.

“There is a people in your kingdom – a blight.

“They do not heed your commands and decrees.

“Please, write a law declaring their destruction.”

His grand vizier’s plan pleased King Xerxes

And Haman gloated o’er his machination.

When word of this deed reached Mordecai’s ears,

The gatekeeper’s heart turned to God in despair.

In sackcloth he sat outside of the doors.

A servant brought news of him to Queen Esther.

The queen quickly sent aid to her cousin.

“Find out what is wrong,” she implored her eunuch.

“Tell her Jews will slain by the dozen.”

And he refused to don the offered tunic.

“Go to the king and plead for salvation.

“Perhaps for a time like this you were chosen.”

“Go to the king without invitation?!

“Only his scepter will save one who goes in.”

“Don’t think your queenship will save you from harm.

“If you keep silent, help will come from elsewhere,

“But you will surely die in the alarm

“Along with your father’s house if you don’t dare.”

“Gather the Jews,” Esther told Mordecai.

“Fast for three days; then I will go to the king –

“Whatever happens.  If I die, I die.”

On the third day, Esther dressed.  She was going.

Sorry it's so pixel-y...
…Esther dressed. She was going.

She walked down the hall and up to his throne.

What will the king think?  Esther’s heart asked in fear.

Xerxes his glimpsed his prize, so fair and alone,

And reached out his scepter: “What is it my dear?

“Whatever you wish, I’ll give it to thee.”

Bravely, Esther spoke, “If it please you, my king

“Tonight is a banquet hosted by me.

“Please come – I’d be honored – and do Haman bring.”

“We will be there,” he answered.  “See you then.”

That night, Xerxes asked her, “What is your request?”

“Tomorrow,” she asked, “come dine here again.

“Then I shall tell you the desire in my breast.”

Again, they had supped, the next evening,

When he asked, “What petition do you want filled?”

“Give me the lives of my people, my king,

“For they have been sold to be slaughtered and killed!”

“Who is the man who this cruel thing would do?”

In answer, she said, “This wicked Haman!

“His edict is death, for I am a Jew.”

The king stormed outside; Haman fell by the queen.

“Please, spare my life!”  came his madman’s harsh cry.

The king came back – “And he’s now on my wife!”

“Sir,” said a man, “there’s a gallows so high

“Which he built to hang the guard who saved your life.”

“Seize him!” roared the king…

“Seize him,” roared the king, “and hang him thereon!”

His rage was abated – and you know the rest.

The king and his queen reversed Haman’s con.

Mordecai got Haman’s job – simply the best!

And unfortunately I’ve run out of minutes, meter, and rhyme

To relate the feast of Purim.  (You can read it in Esther some time.)

~rek

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7 thoughts on “CW6~ The Epic of Esther

  1. hehehehe, even your final blurb rhymes! XD I guess your second last line, or third last if you count the signature, wasn’t completely true. =P I love the style though, with the little asides and play-like notes. “On the scene enters…” that line had me grinning. 😀 Just a quick little thing, earlier on in the poem, you say “Cather virgins beautiful to your harem”, I’m pretty sure you meant “Gather virgins…” right? Also, ellipses are perfectly fine! XD I use them all the time. Great job!

    ~Michael Hollingworth
    Disce Ferenda Pati – Learn to endure what must be borne

    Liked by 1 person

      1. You’re welcome! Yep, I know the feeling. XD Even when I have time I don’t proofread as much as I should. Trust me, I know the feeling. I’ve had comments that could be short stories in and of themselves outlining my errors. =P

        ~Michael Hollingworth
        Disce Ferenda Pati – Learn to endure what must be borne

        Like

      1. yep. You mean you didn’t do it on purpose? XD If so, then you must be a natural! =P

        ~Michael Hollingworth
        Disce Ferenda Pati – Learn to endure what must be borne

        Like

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